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Health Screening

Screening tests can help find diseases and health conditions early, when they are easier to treat.

Also known as secondary prevention, health screening identifies health problems as soon as possible to ensure that you and your family can benefit from early medical treatment.

There are a variety of health screening tests and tools. Many can be done as part of regular checkups with your health care provider. Others may require you to visit a lab or specialized screening location.

Typically, routine health screening is recommended according to your age or stage of life.

Prenatal

Prenatal genetic screening can tell a pregnant woman her chance of having a baby with certain genetic disorders. It is offered free of charge as a choice to all pregnant women with Medical Services Plan (MSP) coverage in BC.  


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Infant

There are a number of screening tests that are recommended for all newborns and infants born in BC. These tests identify diseases or conditions where early treatment is important to prevent disability and promote healthy development.


Regular checkups will allow your care provider to monitor your baby's development and check for possible problems.


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Regular checkups will allow your care provider to monitor your child's growth and development and check for possible problems.


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Regular checkups will allow your care provider to monitor your health and check for possible problems.


If you're a young woman, it may be time to start screening for cervical cancer. Pap tests are recommended for women starting at age 21, or three years after first sexual contact. It's important to follow these recommendations even if you've had the HPV vaccine. Read the recommendations.


If you are sexually active, it's a good idea to get tested for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV. You can see your doctor about testing, or visit a clinic. Read when to test.

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Regular checkups will allow your care provider to monitor your health and check for possible problems.

Regular screening is important throughout adulthood, especially if you're at increased risk for a chronic disease or an infectious disease. You may be referred for blood or urine tests or for other screening procedures. Recommended regular screening tests for all adults include:

  • blood pressure
  • cholesterol
  • kidney function
  • type 2 diabetes
  • skin cancer
  • hearing and vision
  • weight
  • mental health and substance use

If you are sexually active, it's a good idea to get tested for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV. You can see your doctor about testing, or visit a clinic. Read When to test.


It's also recommended that all women age 21 and older get regular cervical cancer screening (Pap test). Read the recommendations.


Depending on your age and your risk of disease, other screening tests may be recommended:

  • Screening mammograms are available for eligible BC women age 40 and up. Your screening recommendations will vary according to your age and your family history of breast cancer. Read the recommendations.
  • Women and men aged 50-74 should get screened regularly for colon cancer. The type of screening test recommended for you will depend on your family history and your personal medical history. Read the recommendations.
  • Men aged 50-70 years who are in reasonably good health should get screened annually for prostate cancer through digital rectal examination. This is done by your doctor during a regular check up. You can also talk to your doctor about the pros and cons of PSA testing. 

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SOURCE: Health Screening ( )
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